RVT Journal Quiz: 40 Issue 4 Article 4 Hyperadrenocorticism in the dog

RVT Journal Quiz: 40 Issue 4 Article 4 Hyperadrenocorticism in the dog

Continuing to learn after achieving RVT status is essential for the individual and the advancement of the profession. RVTs can earn one (1) Continuing Education (CE) credit by reading the CE articles in the RVT Journal, or watching recorded sessions of OAVT presentations, and submitting the successfully completed corresponding quizzes.

If you obtain a score of 8 out of 10 (80%) or higher, you will receive a confirmation email which OAVT members can use as acceptable proof for their online CE record.

Which of the following is not a cause of hyperadrenocorticism in the dog? *
Finding an elevation of ALP on routine blood work should prompt testing for hyperadrenocorticism. *
Which of the following should not be present on an abdominal ultrasound in a dog with hyperadrenocorticism (naturally occurring or iatrogenic)? *
Adrenocortical adenocarcinomas are more common than adrenocortical adenomas. *
Calcinosis cutis is a common finding in dogs with hyperadrenocorticism. *
The following is not a screening test for pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism: *
Which of the following is a recommended therapy for pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism? *
Client education is an important part of the diagnosis and treatment of hyperadrenocorticism. *
What is the appropriate next step if the following ACTH stimulation test result is obtained for a dog receiving trilostane? Time 0 cortisol level: 140 umol/L One hour post ACTH stimulation cortisol level: 400 umol/L *
The prognosis is excellent in a pet with a fully-excised adrenal adenoma. *