RVT Journal Quiz: 40 Issue 3 Article 4 Carboxylic Ionophore Toxicity in Small Animals

RVT Journal Quiz: 40 Issue 3 Article 4 Carboxylic Ionophore Toxicity in Small Animals

Continuing to learn after achieving RVT status is essential for the individual and the advancement of the profession. RVTs can earn one (1) Continuing Education (CE) credit by reading the CE articles in the RVT Journal, or watching recorded sessions of OAVT presentations, and submitting the successfully completed corresponding quizzes.

If you obtain a score of 8 out of 10 (80%) or higher, you will receive a confirmation email which OAVT members can use as acceptable proof for their online CE record.

Regardless of the species involved, all ionophores are toxic if the label instructions and dosing instructions are not followed. *
You are the RVT on duty when a dog is brought in after eating a bag of monensin concentrated premix just a few minutes ago. Currently, the dog is not having any signs.You remember reading about this and recommend to the veterinarian that: *
Ionophores work by binding with cations and forming complexes that alter membrane concentrations and increase transport across lipid membranes. *
Carboxylic ionophores are used therapeutically in cattle, swine, and chickens to: *
One of the most likely sources of ionophore poisoning in small animals is: *
The primary systems affected in small animals ingesting a toxic dose of an ionophore are: *
Intravenous fat emulsion has been used anecdotally to treat the clinical signs of monensin toxicity in dogs. *
The onset of clinical signs for an acute ingestion in dogs is: *
Common signs of ionophore intoxication in dogs are: *
Serum taken from poisoned dogs can be rapidly and economically analyzed for the presence of an ionophore so there is no need to take any other samples. *