2022 OAVT Conference - Critical Care Nutrition

2022 OAVT Conference - Critical Care Nutrition

Continuing to learn after achieving RVT status is essential for the individual and the advancement of the profession. RVTs can earn one (1) Continuing Education (CE) credit by reading the CE articles in the RVT Journal, or watching recorded sessions of OAVT presentations, and submitting the successfully completed corresponding quizzes.

If you obtain a score of 8 out of 10 (80%) or higher, you will receive a confirmation email which OAVT members can use as acceptable proof for their online CE record.

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1. You overhear a conversation involving one of your peers, who is on the phone with Mr. Roberts. Quavo, his missing cat, is home! Your colleague books an appointment for an examination in 3 days to screen for any accident or injury that may have occurred while he was missing these last 4 weeks. The owner mentioned that Quavo is very excited to eat from a bowl again. What condition are you worried about in this patient? (Questions 1-4 all consider this case) *
2. How can this be prevented? *
3. What diet types are best for these patients? *
4. You verify with your team member that Mr. Roberts has already fed a large meal. What signs should your client watch for? *
5. An orphaned litter of kittens presents to your practice. You take them home to foster them, because you are an RVT, so of course you do. They abruptly stop eating at 10 days of age. They are diagnosed with fading kitten syndrome and hypoglycemia. They will no longer nurse from the bottle. What specific nutrition intervention do you pursue, and why? *
6. An 8-month-old German Shepherd presents to your practice with significant vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia, and pyrexia. He is ultimately diagnosed with parvovirus and hospitalized on IV fluids and medical intervention. What are his nutrition risk factors? (Questions 6-8 all consider this case) *
7. When vomiting and nausea are controlled, what can be attempted and considered? *
8. If these methods do not provide adequate nutrition, what specific nutrition intervention should be pursued next, and why? *
9. Tinkerbell, a 16-year-old DSH presents to your practice. Her BCS is 2/9 with marked muscle wasting. She is diagnosed with stage III CKD. She has been hyporexic for “a while,” with complete anorexia for the past three days. Coax feeding has been unsuccessful, and hospitalization has been declined. What is the ideal means of nutrition intervention? (Questions 9 & 10 consider this case) *
10. Her current body weight is 2.3 kg. How many calories do you feed in the first day, when successful method is established? *